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Proprietor laments dearth of quality teachers in schools

The founder of Nickel Private Schools, Ibadan, Mrs. Modupe Adeleke, has expressed concern over the dearth of quality teachers in many secondary schools in the country.

The founder of Nickel Private Schools, Ibadan, Mrs. Modupe Adeleke, has expressed concern over the dearth of quality teachers in many secondary schools in the country.

Speaking at a briefing held in the Oyo State capital to announce the 30th anniversary celebration of the group of schools, Adeleke warned that the development could affect national growth and sustainable development.

Stressing that pupils in private schools were more likely to succeed in their examinations than their counterparts in public schools because of the highlighted factor, she said, “I believe that part of the problem we have in the educational sector is lack of funds.  Government must pump in enough money to be able to run good schools, which in turn will promote national development.

“It is important for government to vote more money for education. It must also help to improve pupils’ performances by providing good studying environment and good teachers.

“Teaching is a noble profession and it is advisable that people who teach must have teaching qualifications. Unfortunately, today we have many teachers who are not competent to teach in our schools. This is not good for national and indeed, sustainable development.

“The teaching profession is not meant for everybody. That someone has all the qualifications or even the Teachers’ Registration Certificate does not make him a good teacher. The person may not have the passion for the work and the skill to impact knowledge. These are not the types of teachers we need in our education system at all levels. Everybody cannot be a teacher.”

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While speaking on curriculum as designed by government, Adeleke advised teachers to be innovative when teaching the pupils. According to her, it was important for the pupils to know why they were being taught the subjects, stressing that it would be counter-productive if pupils had to rely solely on notes.

She said, “We run the same curriculum with public schools, with just a slight difference. Private schools have a broader curriculum to cater more for an individual, we include literature in the curriculum at an early stage to enable the pupils to read and recite at their tender age.”

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